Feild 1. Part 1: Putting pieces together.

Field and subject combination processes should be a science in their own right, because I feel like a mad scientist when I connect the dots.

The City Project, in its smallest beginnings gave me visions of future cities, their technology and their power sources. At first I looked into familiar ground, and I’m naturally drawn to the Ocean. I wanted to include as much influence from it as possible, through observational, photographic and imaginative pictures.


 

A Slightly horror-themed Pompeii worm, something that is rather resident in situations normally severely hazardous to other forms of life; very high pressure and immense heat.
A Slightly horror-themed Pompeii worm, something that is rather resident in situations normally severely hazardous to other forms of life; very high pressure and immense heat.

At first, I had nothing. I didn’t exactly know where to start on this project, so instead of rushing to find something, I decided to work with what I already had: A passion for the Ocean, and my imagination. I started by watching, in depth, The BBC series: The Blue Planet, narrated by Sir David Attenborough. I was very interested in one thing in particular, The Abyssal zone. It caught my attention, how in such a dark and difficult place could produce such unique forms of life,Β  as I watched Anglerfish stalk small Copepods and bio-luminescent jellyfish give off amazing displays of colour. So the I let my imagination run wild and I created some small renditions of various Abyssal zone animals. I didn’t stick to observational sketching for reference though, instead I drew from memory and let my imagination fill in the blanks; this way I’m sure to come with something new and different. Its a process that helps me to generate new ideas, a form of practical meditation really.


An abyssal zone fish. Most of these creatures are dark in colour, posess insanely huge eyes for sight in poor conditions, and some form of bio-luminescent lure to help them catch prey in the pitch black of the sea.
An abyssal zone fish. Most of these creatures are dark in colour, posess insanely huge eyes for sight in poor conditions, and some form of bio-luminescent lure to help them catch prey in the pitch black of the sea.

With each drawing produced I kept in mind the means by which it was made. I Enjoyed using black ink and fineliners simply because they were familiar to me and because I wanted to improve how I shaded or Cross-thatched a picture, experimenting with tone and indentation. I also used coloured pencils, felt tip pens, and a White gel Pen, which I would later go on to use on a number of black-paper drawings.

The beginnings of the project were taking place. I was feeling slightly more confident about where this was going but I still could not see my direction very clearly.

A fantastical crab. some of the drawings I had made, were taken from verious different species of one order, and combined into one thing. It is a process which can help me to generate new ideas and different ways of looking at things.
A fantastical crab. Some of the drawings I had made, were taken from various different species of one order, and combined to create a wholly unique creature. It is a process which can help me to generate new ideas and different ways of looking at things.
An imagined version of a pre-historic Water Scorpion.
An imagined version of a prehistoric Sea Scorpion.
A water god. ink drawings like this help me think on how the theme can be more refined by giving it a character. What will this character look like in it's surroundings? which surroundings would best suit it? these are some of the questions Iask myself when i'm working so as to Further develop ideas and contextualize the work.
A water god. Ink drawings like this help me think on how the theme can be more refined by introducing a character. What will this character look like in it’s surroundings? which surroundings would best suit it? these are some of the questions I ask myself when I’m working so as to Further develop ideas and contextualize the work.
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