Ocean.

Whilst my stint in the cabinet was going on, a brief came about discussing visual languages and how best to convey ideas and emotions through out work.

We were advised to address such grave topics as the current Ebola crisis for example.

I decided to work on a topic with slightly less detectable issues.

I Love the Ocean, Its where I became a man, where I grew up, my playground and my classroom. At first the ocean seems like an either very intimidating or very beautiful place which most people dont really know alot about. My work thus far, is to show hopefully how some might see it as Only a beautiful place that doesn’t really look like there is much wrong at first sight. This is very much not the case, but thats for later. For now, here are some of the associated pieces including ones from the previous Cabinet Stint

Various traces from pages in the tome of summer. This collage served as a mind map, helping me to piece together some of the highlights of my time.
Various traces from pages in the tome of summer. This collage served as a mind map, helping me to piece together some of the highlights of my time.
A yacht, Close hauling (sailing as close to the wind as possible) at dawn on the western Indian Ocean
A yacht, Close hauling (sailing as close to the wind as possible) at dawn on the western Indian Ocean
A wind-awareness chart, with its various points marked out not in letters or numbers, but instead their representations by International Maritime signaling Flags
A wind-awareness chart, with its various points marked out not in letters or numbers, but instead their representations by International Maritime signaling Flags

 

A Diver, ascending from a dive using a CCR (closed circuit re-breather), being followed by pilotfish.
A Diver, ascending from a dive using a CCR (closed circuit re-breather), being followed by pilotfish.
Adapted from a diagram in James Nestor's book "Deep". This shows the 5 different zones of the Ocean and the depth in feet that some organisms (ourselves included) are able to reach.
Adapted from a diagram in James Nestor’s book “Deep”. This shows the 5 different zones of the Ocean and the depth in feet that some organisms (ourselves included) are able to reach.
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An enlarged version of the Manta traced from the book of summer. The colour pattern matches that of a pair of my board-shorts, things of great sentimental value to me. You might find similar colours laid out in a similar way if you were looking at a sunset.
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After the large Manta, I wanted to see what the creature is composed of. What shapes define it and what movements it might make. I played around with this for awhile.One thing that was particularly hard to figure out was the shape of the Manta’s cephalic horns (the two long lobes on either side of their mouth, used to help filter plankton through). Their shapes change based on where the Manta is moving and at what angle.

Looking at various forms of sealife and investigating into how they move helps me develop a sort of ‘sea-style’ with my hand. Mantas, cartilaginous fish (having a skeleton make of cartilage instead of bone),

that are relatives of other various rays, sharks and chimeras ( deep dwelling fish), all share similar methods of movement and shape. By drawing them in different poses and different angles you can start to create poses from the imagination and make them look accurate. Its almost like there is a set formula.

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A set of Traces from the picture above. Perhaps these can be used as a print?

 

 

 

 

 

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