Summer part Three

Various different fishing methods and vessels have developed over time and have been used for hundreds of years along the coast of Eastern Africa. I chose to observe and sketch various different means and methods of making a living by either trade or fishing.

A small dugout canoe, used mostly by either lobster trappers or small line fishermen.
A small dugout canoe, used mostly by either lobster trappers or small line fishermen.

 

The Ngalawa is a widespread and versatile vessel used for trade, fishing, and with the development of the tourism industry in East Africa, for leisure cruises, although the boats used for tourists vary slightly in size and comfort.
The Ngalawa is a widespread and versatile vessel used for trade, fishing, and with the development of the tourism industry in East Africa, for leisure cruises, although the boats used for tourists vary slightly in size and comfort.

 

The Jahazi is a large trading Dhow that is still used primarily for transport of goods to towns and villages located all along the coast. Their large Lanteen sails silhouetted against a setting sun are a popular and beautiful sight to behold.
The Jahazi is a large trading Dhow that is still used primarily for transport of goods to towns and villages located all along the coast. Their large Lanteen sails silhouetted against a setting sun are a popular and beautiful sight to behold.

 

Many fishermen employ the use of large ring-nets to catch their fish. Settling for outboard motors as opposed to sails, these fishing boats exit the port in vast numbers looking for sights of schooling tuna and other game fish.
Many fishermen employ the use of large ring-nets to catch their fish. Settling for outboard motors as opposed to sails, these fishing boats exit the port in vast numbers looking for sights of schooling tuna and other game fish, occasionally venturing inshore to see what the reefs may have to offer. Unfortunately this means that considerable damage is inflicted on the surrounding reef and many fish species that aren’t of their use will also perish.

 

The Masaai Tribe come from the northern part of Tanzania and all across Kenya. They are warriors and herdsmen, but more and more Masaai are leaving their ancestral homes to seek employ in the ever-developing cities around them. They attract much attention from tourists and are sought after security guards.
The Masaai Tribe come from the northern part of Tanzania and all across Kenya. They are warriors and herdsmen, but more and more Masaai are leaving their ancestral homes to seek employ in the ever-developing cities around them. They attract much attention from tourists and are sought after security guards.

 

This is an adaptation of a photograph taken in 2011 in the coastal town of Tanga, just south of the Kenyan border with Tanzania. Dynamite fishing is an ever-growing problem all along the coast of Tanzania. stocks of fish are completely decimated and, as seen here, other marine creatures are also at a high risk. The detrimental effects of dynamite fishing mean that much is lost in terms of the East African coast's natural underwater beauty, and the complex ecosystem is in jeopardy.
This is an adaptation of a photograph taken in 2011 in the coastal town of Tanga, just south of the Kenyan border with Tanzania. Dynamite fishing is an ever-growing problem all along the coast of Tanzania. stocks of fish are completely decimated and, as seen here, other marine creatures are also at a high risk. The detrimental effects of dynamite fishing mean that much is lost in terms of the East African coast’s natural underwater beauty, and the complex ecosystem is in jeopardy.

 

A realization came to me that the issues surrounding harmful fishing practices may indeed go a lot deeper than what is seen on the surface and in the news. I plan to investigate this more, and explore the human involvement and issues surrounding these areas.

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