Summer part two.

Diving is a large part of what happens at home, and I wanted to sketch out everything I had seen or hoped to see whilst on dives. the sketches were purely from memory with only the slightest amount of visual reference from field-guides to confirm any anatomical complexities.

A halfbeak Cleaner shrimp. These little creatures will clean the dead skin off your hands if you sit long enough for them to get close. Usually found in crevices in large colonies.
A halfbeak Cleaner shrimp. These little creatures will clean the dead skin off your hands if you sit long enough for them to get close. Usually found in crevices in large colonies.
A Marbled electric Ray or Torpedo Ray. These cartilaginous fish are able to discharge a powerful electric shock either to deter predators or stun prey. One swam right underneath me once, quite contently snuffling around in the sand looking for small crustaceans and fish to make a meal out of.
A Marbled electric Ray or Torpedo Ray. These cartilaginous fish are able to discharge a powerful electric shock either to deter predators or stun prey. One swam right underneath me once, quite contently snuffling around in the sand looking for small crustaceans and fish to make a meal out of.
A Cowtail Stingray. A relative of the Torpedo Ray, Stingrays are armed with a venomous spine on their tails which can be lethal to humans. Meant for purely defense, Stingrays sift through sand looking for small fish and crustaceans to consume with their unique set of flat, grinding teeth.
A Cowtail Stingray. A relative of the Torpedo Ray, Stingrays are armed with a venomous spine on their tails which can be lethal to humans. Meant for purely defense, Stingrays sift through sand looking for small fish and crustaceans to consume with their unique set of flat, grinding teeth.
A Hammerhead shark. although i didn't see one of these magnificent animals up close, they tend to school in large numbers off the coast during certain times of year.
A Hammerhead shark. although I didn’t see one of these magnificent animals up close, they tend to school in large numbers off the coast during certain times of year.
An elusive angel Shark. This piece is an adaptation of a picutre in a field guide to coastal environments from 1982.
An elusive Angel Shark. This piece is an adaptation of a picture in a field guide to coastal environments from 1982.
Rhincodon Typus, The whale Shark is the largest of all fish, and oddly enough feeds on one of the smallest organisms in the oceans. Being Filter-feeders, Whale Sharks glide through the water with relative ease, their mouths agape, filtering through immense amounts of water to consume the microorganisms contained within.
Rhincodon Typus, The whale Shark is the largest of all fish, and oddly enough feeds on one of the smallest organisms in the oceans. Being Filter-feeders, Whale Sharks glide through the water with relative ease, their mouths agape, filtering through immense amounts of water to consume the microorganisms contained within.
This sketch was done originally on a plastic slate at 12 meters underwater. The Octopus remained incredibly still and observant during the encounter.
This sketch was done originally on a plastic slate at 12 meters underwater. The Octopus remained incredibly still and observant during the encounter.

Having observed many of the natural aspects of my surroundings, I was then drawn into documenting the more human aspects of my home. Adaptation to a coastal Lifestyle in particular.

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