Shark Gods.

Forgot to put any of this in the last post.

I’ve been researching alternate perspectives about sharks in island cultures, more specifically those in the pacific islands. Fiji and Hawaii stand out. The general feel of these deities is a positive one. Each one of them, (the Hawaiians have seven!) is benevolent and kind towards humans.

Dakuwaqa, a Fijian Shark-god. Believed to be able to transform into any fish. He is greatly revered by fishermen and sharks are never fished for as it might angrr this god.
Dakuwaqa, a Fijian Shark-god. Believed to be able to transform into any fish. He is greatly revered by fishermen and sharks are never fished for as it might anger this god.
Kuhaimoana, a colossal Hawaiian shark god
Kuhaimoana, a colossal Hawaiian shark god
A rough plan of what Ka'ahupahau might look like, keeping the fiery red hair from her human life.
A rough plan of what Ka’ahupahau might look like, keeping the fiery red hair from her human life.
Ka'ahupahau, a Hawaiian shark goddess.
Ka’ahupahau, a Hawaiian shark goddess.

Only three of the many shark gods of the Pacific cultures are shown here. Shark are a highly influential part of island life out in the Oceanic societies, both feared and respected, revered and loved by many. This is in stark contrast to modern societies demonised view on shark. There is something here that can be learned by all, that sharks not only have a decisive part to play in the balance of the ocean’s ecosystems, but also in cultural heritage and ancient beliefs that keep these diverse islander’s reverence for the Ocean alive.

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